2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale
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The annotated text of this modern classic. It assiduously illuminates the extravagant wordplay and the frequent literary allusions, parodies, and cross-references. Edited with a preface, introduction and notes by Alfred Appel, Jr.

Amazon.com Review

In 1954 Vladimir Nabokov asked one American publisher to consider "a firebomb that I have just finished putting together." The explosive device: Lolita, his morality play about a middle-aged European''s obsession with a 12-year-old American girl. Two years later, the New York Times called it "great art." Other reviewers staked a higher moral ground (the editor of the London Sunday Express declaring it "the filthiest book I''ve ever read"). Since then, the sinuous novel has never ceased to astound. Even Nabokov was astonished by its place in the popular imagination. One biographer writes that "he was quite shocked when a little girl of eight or nine came to his door for candy on Halloween, dressed up by her parents as Lolita." And when it came time to casting the film, Nabokov declared, "Let them find a dwarfess!"

The character Lolita''s power now exists almost separately from the endlessly inventive novel. If only it were read as often as it is alluded to. Alfred Appel Jr., editor of the annotated edition, has appended some 900 notes, an exhaustive, good-humored introduction, and a recent preface in which he admits that the "reader familiar with Lolita can approach the apparatus as a separate unit, but the perspicacious student who keeps turning back and forth from text to Notes risks vertigo." No matter. The notes range from translations to the anatomical to the complex textual. Appel is also happy to point out the Great Punster''s supposedly unintended word play: he defends the phrase "Beaver Eaters" as "a portmanteau of ''Beefeaters'' (the yeoman of the British royal guard) and their beaver hats."

Review

"...the reader of Lolita attempts to arrive at some sense of its overall ''meaning,'' while at the same time having to struggle...with the difficulties posed by the recondite materials and rich, elaborate verbal textures. The main purpose of this edition is to solve such local problems and to show how they contribute to the total design of the novel."--From the Preface by Alfred Appel, Jr.

"Fascinatingly detailed."--Edmund Morris, The New York Times Book Review

From the Inside Flap

d text of this modern classic. It assiduously illuminates the extravagant wordplay and the frequent literary allusions, parodies, and cross-references. Edited with a preface, introduction and notes by Alfred Appel, Jr.

From the Back Cover

The annotated text of this modern classic. It assiduously illuminates the extravagant wordplay and the frequent literary allusions, parodies, and cross-references. Edited with a preface, introduction and notes by Alfred Appel, Jr.

About the Author

Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov was born on April 23, 1899, in St. Petersburg, Russia. The Nabokovs were known for their high culture and commitment to public service, and the elder Nabokov was an outspoken opponent of antisemitism and one of the leaders of the opposition party, the Kadets. In 1919, following the Bolshevik revolution, he took his family into exile. Four years later he was shot and killed at a political rally in Berlin while trying to shield the speaker from right-wing assassins.

The Nabokov household was trilingual, and as a child Nabokov was already reading Wells, Poe, Browning, Keats, Flaubert, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Tolstoy, and Chekhov, alongside the popular entertainments of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Jules Verne. As a young man, he studied Slavic and romance languages at Trinity College, Cambridge, taking his honors degree in 1922. For the next eighteen years he lived in Berlin and Paris, writing prolifically in Russian under the pseudonym Sirin and supporting himself through translations, lessons in English and tennis, and by composing the first crossword puzzles in Russian. In 1925 he married Vera Slonim, with whom he had one child, a son, Dmitri.

Having already fled Russia and Germany, Nabokov became a refugee once more in 1940, when he was forced to leave France for the United States. There he taught at Wellesley, Harvard, and Cornell. He also gave up writing in Russian and began composing fiction in English. In his afterword to Lolita he claimed: "My private tragedy, which cannot, and indeed should not, be anybody''s concern, is that I had to abandon my natural idiom, my untrammeled, rich, and infinitely docile Russian tongue for a second-rate brand of English, devoid of any of those apparatuses--the baffling mirror, the black velvet backdrop, the implied associations and traditions--which the native illusionist, frac-tails flying, can magically use to transcend the heritage in his own way." [p. 317] Yet Nabokov''s American period saw the creation of what are arguably his greatest works, Bend Sinister (1947), Lolita (1955), Pnin (1957), and Pale Fire (1962), as well as the translation of his earlier Russian novels into English. He also undertook English translations of works by Lermontov and Pushkin and wrote several books of criticism. Vladimir Nabokov died in Montreux, Switzerland, in 1977.

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4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
476 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

George Maio
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Worth Reading--and the annotations are a big help.
Reviewed in the United States on December 30, 2018
If you were going to read Lolita, you should read this version, as the annotations will be of great help. So will the following advice. First, my personal history with a novel: Nabokov was one of my mother''s professors when she attended Cornell. So I always... See more
If you were going to read Lolita, you should read this version, as the annotations will be of great help. So will the following advice.

First, my personal history with a novel: Nabokov was one of my mother''s professors when she attended Cornell. So I always wanted to read this novel. I made my first attempt in my 20''s and gave up at page 90. I tried again in my 30''s, and quit at page 95. This time (much older), I finally finished; the annotated version was a big help. For new readers I suggest this preparation:

In this novel, Nabokov is just doing a variation of what Edgar Allen Poe does with his unreliable first-person narrators.
So I would suggest, if you never encountered these in school, first reading the Poe short stories "The Tell-Tale Heart" and "The Cask of Amotillado." Not to ruin these stories for you, but in "The Tell-Tale Heart" the narrator is obviously crazy, but spends the story trying to convince the reader that what he did--murdering his roommate--made absolutely perfect sense. In "The Cask of Amontillado," the narrator is obviously extremely intelligent. He has committed the perfect murder. But it is also obvious that he has totally insane, as it appears that his victim''s alleged offenses against him are a complete figment of his imagination. Again this narrator tries to convince you that what he did--killing a friend--was something wonderful. Nabokov is using the same technique with Lolita. But since Poe had already used the crazy-but-eloquent-first-person-narrator-trying-to-convince-you-the-murder-he-committed-was-justifiable plotline, if Nabokov wanted to be original he had to use a variation on this approach--switch out murder and replace it with perversion. (Sex with a 12-year-old girl.) The narrator is right out of Poe, trying to convince the reader that what he did was perfectly fine.

You''ll also want to read the Poe poem "Annabel Lee," as the narrator often references that. And also remember that Edgar Allan Poe married a 14 year old girl when he was 27. I''m sure that relationship was an inspiration for Lolita. This whole novel comes right from Edgar Allan Poe.

The problem I have with this novel is that the narrative approach borrowed from Edgar Allan Poe works a lot better in a short story than it does in a novel. After a while the story becomes tedious. After 100 pages you will probably be thinking, "Okay, I get the point. The narrator needs to be on a sex-offender registry, but sure does a good job trying to convince us that what he''s doing is okay. And there are plenty of people in the world just like this. Frightening thought." Unless you are a pervert yourself, you''ll have that concept down in the first half of the book. Then you''ll have to slog through the second half of the book where not much happens until our narrator meets a very unusual playwright. On the plus side, it''s rare to see a novel written in such a beautiful prose style. I can think of only F. Scott Fitzgerald and David Foster Wallace being equal to this.

So this book is worth reading, but just realize that you''ll get the author''s point at page 100 with 150 more to read, so finishing the novel might get a little annoying.

By the way, my mother didn''t think the novel was any good.
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Graeme
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Creative and Funny
Reviewed in the United States on April 21, 2017
This was my first time reading Lolita, but I understand that there are some people here who, having already read this classic before, have decided to look into an annotated version to see how those extra appendages might contribute to the overall experience of a second read... See more
This was my first time reading Lolita, but I understand that there are some people here who, having already read this classic before, have decided to look into an annotated version to see how those extra appendages might contribute to the overall experience of a second read through. With this in mind, I''ll try to first review the novel itself for those who are unfamiliar, and perhaps undecided, and then I will add my own thoughts on the Introduction and annotations that have been provided by Alfred Appel, Jr.

On the surface, you might imagine it uncomfortable to read a story in which our narrator and protagonist is a middle aged man with an obsessive fetish for "nymphets," who forms a sexual relationship with a 12 year old girl, traveling around the country while cunningly passing himself off as her father. But readers might find it reassuring(or disappointing) to know that there''s actually very little obscenity in this novel, that sex is never actually described in detail, that the closest it comes to erotica would be when Lo reclines and naively rests her legs on the narrator''s lap for the first time, that this book is actually a highbrow comedy. Humbert Humbert(or H.H.), as he calls himself, is a handsome, wealthy, and intelligent man, who, seemingly bored and callous to the world, constantly injects his uniquely blithe and sardonic humor into the text. Every character he meets is mocked with a jolly contempt. Every scenario in this book is turned into a parody. Consciously aware of his own creepiness and mental fragility, "lucidly insane," H.H. even parodies himself.

Here you will find a writing style that will make you feel more sophisticated just for having understood it. There are literary allusions to please the English buffs, along with an expansive vocabulary including, but not limited to, some rare and exotic words which do not even appear in the standard Kindle dictionary. But most of the humor, I think, is really in the tone and the way characters are portrayed, and even if you don''t quite understand every remark H.H. makes, none of this is really necessary to appreciate the story.

In Part Two, the focus starts to shift a bit to some of the more subtle features of their relationship: the places they visited, Dolly growing up, Dolly bringing friends over, Dolly playing tennis, etc. I found it impressive to see how the characters changed and developed throughout this part, and Humbert Humbert''s reflections on their relationship were even somewhat profound sometimes. Some people who aren''t interested in the aesthetics here might find this area to be a little slow, but I promise you''ll be rewarded soon after. The second to last chapter is hilarious.

As for the annotations, they were ok. They provide some extra background information, they translate the French for you, but they were nothing special. Some reviewers have complained about the lack of in-text hyperlinks, but I honestly don''t think these would have been beneficial. The numerical chapter headings already have hyperlinks, my kindle app lets me jump back and forth with just a couple finger taps, and in-text hyperlinks would have been distracting. However, A.A. does seem to give away some spoilers in his annotations, so for those who would prefer a full immersion experience and who would like to try to predict some mysteries on their own, I might suggest actually ignoring the annotations the first time they read Lolita, or at least the ones that don''t translate French.

The introduction seemed to start off well until Appel started talking about literary involution. There is a lot of involution in Lolita, realism is deliberately thrown out the window sometimes, but I saw this as contributing to the comical effect and nothing more. Appel seems to interpret some kind of subjectivist philosophical meaning in it which I thought just went too far. His anecdote about the Puppet Show, and how his 5 and 3 year old children began laughing to steel themselves against the terror of questioning the reality of reality(whatever that means) was so stupid, I immediately skipped the rest of the Introduction and continued onto the Foreword. Nabokov''s commentary on Lolita at the end, however, was pleasant.
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Melanti
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Horrible Kindle conversion
Reviewed in the United States on June 3, 2014
To be clear - this review is specific to the Kindle edition of the annotated novel. I would give Lolita itself 5 stars and then some. There''s around 200 pages worth of footnotes and they have a link to the footnotes at the front of each chapter - but no link on... See more
To be clear - this review is specific to the Kindle edition of the annotated novel. I would give Lolita itself 5 stars and then some.

There''s around 200 pages worth of footnotes and they have a link to the footnotes at the front of each chapter - but no link on the things that are being foot-noted and no indication at all that they were discussed.

There''s no easy way to switch back and forth between the footnotes and the main text. To look something up you basically have to page backwards to the first page of the chapter, click on the link, then page forward through the notes to the item you''re interested in, then admittedly there IS a link provided there to send you back to the main text.

So to make the links work without constant paging back and forth, it''s almost like you have to read the full notes for the chapter BEFORE reading the chapter. It''s really distracting and pulling me out of the narrative. I thought it was going to be individual footnotes so I could look things up as I came across them - not one giant note for the whole chapter. (Little individual footnotes was how the intro is formatted.)

You can jump from one footnote to another, from the footnote to multiple spots in the text, etc. But you can''t jump directly from the text to the footnote!

I think this is one book that would work a lot better with paper rather than this really poorly formatted ebook edition.
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Sarah
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Stunning portrayal of perfection in literary skill
Reviewed in the United States on January 24, 2021
Before you dive into this.. please read up and watcg indepth videos on Narcissistic Personality Disorder. Find out A. What gaslighting is B. What trauma bonding is C. What Cerebral Narcissism is D. Then read it... Watch the master at... See more
Before you dive into this.. please read up and watcg indepth videos on Narcissistic Personality Disorder.
Find out
A. What gaslighting is
B. What trauma bonding is
C. What Cerebral Narcissism is
D. Then read it...
Watch the master at work...
This meticulous perfection of composition and depicton of utter NPD will leave you in tears.
Without giving anything away..
Try to disregard anything you heard about it..
The point is not Lolita at all.. it is his grandiose narcissism. Everyone needs to take a hard look at this book, themselves, and others.
The tiniest line in the book summarizes brilliantly the only recourse for everyone.
If anyone can guess it.. write me.. piecesinorder@gmail.com
4 people found this helpful
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J. Schwarz
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Explains the difficult terminology one needs to know.
Reviewed in the United States on May 22, 2019
Lolita is not an easy book to read. There are many phrases in a foreign language and the author makes up words and uses words most people do not know. This annotated version puts numbers on the lines that are difficult to understand. If you are reading a line you don''t... See more
Lolita is not an easy book to read. There are many phrases in a foreign language and the author makes up words and uses words most people do not know. This annotated version puts numbers on the lines that are difficult to understand. If you are reading a line you don''t understand you go to the back of the book where there are explanations for the line and number. This makes the book much more comprehensible. Many in my class were quite lost without these helpful explanations.
5 people found this helpful
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Missy K.
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Gross
Reviewed in the United States on December 29, 2020
This is the first classic book I wish didn''t exist in a way. It is written from the perspective of a hebephile a man obsessed with preteen girls whom he calls nymphets. He becomes obsessed with a child and grooms and manipulates her into being his play thing. Its a really... See more
This is the first classic book I wish didn''t exist in a way. It is written from the perspective of a hebephile a man obsessed with preteen girls whom he calls nymphets. He becomes obsessed with a child and grooms and manipulates her into being his play thing. Its a really awful classic.
3 people found this helpful
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William J. Fallon
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Worthwhile If You Enjoy the Original
Reviewed in the United States on August 23, 2016
Lolita the book is excellent and everyone knows what it is about. Methinks the only thing one can review are the annotations. I got a lot out of them. Nabokov isn''t the type to explain what he''s doing so the notes are very useful. There are a lot of foreign phrases and... See more
Lolita the book is excellent and everyone knows what it is about. Methinks the only thing one can review are the annotations. I got a lot out of them. Nabokov isn''t the type to explain what he''s doing so the notes are very useful. There are a lot of foreign phrases and references to literature and even connections between material early and later in the book. I would read Lolita first, on it''s own, to appreciate the book the way Nabokov wrote it. Then go back and read with the references so what the annotator says adds to and doesn''t change what the author wrote.
11 people found this helpful
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D'vo
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Vladimir Nabokov is a thought provoking read
Reviewed in the United States on November 4, 2019
Lolita should not be read as pornographic. Nabokov crafts a disturbing but all to plausible tale of a mans decent into preversion. Lolita is the victim not the seductress. first published in Paris in 1955. still valid today. people need to see how sick society can be.... See more
Lolita should not be read as pornographic. Nabokov crafts a disturbing but all to plausible tale of a mans decent into preversion. Lolita is the victim not the seductress. first published in Paris in 1955. still valid today. people need to see how sick society can be.
anyway this version has extensive notes explaining many Russian and historical references.
2 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

The Girl With the Plants and Books!
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A fantastic, annotated version offering greater insight into this complex book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 18, 2021
Bought to replace an old and battered copy, I like the addition of annotation as a guide to improving my reading of this book, offering a lot more insight to a standalone text. This is a nice-looking copy of a classic that deserves its place on the shelf.
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Useful for academic studies
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 12, 2018
I bought this when studying for a master''s degree in literature. Lolita was one of the books considered in my dissertation. This annotated version helped me considerably when analyzing the themes and so on. Well referenced. Easy to read.
4 people found this helpful
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weirdo666
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Book feels a bit flimsy, thin paper, mediocre font / letters
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 12, 2019
not commenting on the story, quality of the book is a bit disappointing. thin paper and the font / print quality is average at best
3 people found this helpful
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Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Stunningly written
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 24, 2019
As a literature student I could not recommend another novel as highly as this one. Be warned the content does put off others but one should look past that.
One person found this helpful
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Tom Keane
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
the annotated Lolita is a brilliant incite into the authors mind
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 10, 2016
For any lover of Nabokov, the annotated Lolita is a brilliant incite into the authors mind, how he arrived at the decisions he did, what inspired him to write the story, and the notes and speculations which appeared as pen met paper.
3 people found this helpful
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2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

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2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale

2021 new arrival The Annotated lowest Lolita: Revised new arrival and Updated outlet sale